Earth & Environmental Sciences at Rensselaer

The past 15 years have been exciting, as new understanding of the interconnectedness among air, water, and solid Earth has come into sharper focus. We address key topics ranging from environmental contaminants in local waterways to the evolution of our planet.

  • Program Spotlight

    B.S. Environmental Sciences

    Understand the ecological and cultural systems supporting all life on earth.

  • Program Spotlight

    Ph.D in Geology

    Use techniques ranging from seismological and satellite-tracking investigations of crustal motions to state-of-the-art geochemical instruments.

Announcements

The Department of Earth & Environmental Sciences at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in Troy, NY invites applications for an open rank tenure-track/tenured position in Earth Systems Science. The E&ES Department research areas include experimental, analytical and environmental geochemistry and petrology of Earth’s systems, environmental informatics, solid Earth geophysics, paleoclimate, origins of life and geomicrobiology.

News

A natural “battery” of briny liquids and volcanic minerals may have produced Mars’ organic carbon, according to new analysis of three Martian meteorites by a team including researchers at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute.

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The European Association of Geochemistry has recognized paleoclimate expert Morgan Schaller for early career achievements with its prestigious 2018 Houtermans Award, bestowed annually to  scientists who are within 12 years of beginning their doctoral studies.

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How do we keep the lines of communication open in the face of disaster? Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute is serving up fresh ideas as part of the “Call for Code” hackathon challenge in partnership with IBM, David Clark Cause, United Nations Human Rights, and The American Red Cross.

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Lake George, N.Y. – The world’s most advanced environmental monitoring system – developed through The Jefferson Project at Lake George – is being used to understand and protect Skaneateles Lake, a central New York drinking water source now threatened by toxic algae. Building on a connection through the New York State Harmful Algal Bloom (HABs) Initiative launched in late 2017, the Jefferson Project installed a custom-designed robotic sensing platform on Skaneateles, and began collecting data just prior to an early-August HABs event this year.

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Evidence from rocks in Yosemite National Park suggests that granite stored in the Earth’s crust is partially molten at 500 degrees Celsius, nearly 200 degrees lower than had previously been believed.

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Contact Information

Earth and Environmental Sciences

Jonsson-Rowland Science Center, 1W19
110 8th Street
Troy, NY 12180