Physics, Applied Physics, and Astronomy at Rensselaer

Physics is the source of new concepts about the nature of the universe and is a driving force for new technologies. The fundamental physics research of one generation often leads to the applied physics and technology of the next.

  • Program Spotlight

    B.S. in Physics

    A solid foundation in fundamental theoretical and experimental scientific principles.

  • Program Spotlight

    Concentration in Computational Physics

    An excellent opportunity for students to use Rensselaer’s world-class supercomputing center, which operates an 80,000 CPU Blue Gene Q supercomputer and a Watson machine.

  • Program Spotlight

    Ph.D in Physics

    While the usual program of a graduate student is a highly specialized one compared to most undergraduate programs, substantial opportunities exist, both in principle and in practice, for students to undertake programs of study and research which span one or more fields.

Announcements

The Department of Physics, Applied Physics and Astronomy invites applications for the position of Laboratory Supervisor providing technical and logistic support for introductory and advanced undergraduate laboratories.

New effort among faculty is opening a pathway between social sciences and technical sciences

Achievements of Undergraduate and Graduate students recognized at School of Science Commencement brunch.

News

Nanophotonics expert and physics professor Shawn-Yu Lin will receive a 2016 IEEE award for his role in discovering the darkest nano-material on Earth.

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Executive Director of the United Nations World Food Programme Ertharin Cousin urged graduates to think first of others and be the first generation that embraces technology for all the right reasons at the 210th Commencement.

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Researchers have developed a new method to quickly and accurately determine that of phosphorene, a promising new material with potential application in semiconductor transistors. 

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Plasmons, quasiparticles arising from the collective motion of electrons on the surface of a metal, can strongly modify the behavior of nearby light, and could be instrumental in building some of the key components of a quantum circuit. 

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Michael Shur, Professor of Solid State Electronics has received an Institute of Engineering and Technology (IET) Achievement award for pioneering contributions to deep ultraviolet light emitting diode technology.

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Contact Information

Physics, Applied Physics, and Astronomy

Jonsson Rowland Science Center, Room 1C25
110 8th Street
Troy, NY 12180

(518) 276-6310