Michael L. Century

Michael L. Century

Arts

Michael Century, M.A. (music history and theory), Berkeley, was educated in musicology, piano performance  at the Universities of Toronto , and California at Berkeley, and science/technology policy at Sussex University (U.K.). In his scholarly work, he studies the history and sociology of art-technology interactions in the twentieth century, highlighting the dynamics of innovation in creative software cultures. Long associated with The Banff Centre for the Arts in Canada, Century founded the Centre's Media Arts Division in 1988, and headed the Inter-arts program and Jazz workshop there from 1981-87. From 1993-2002 he was a program manager, consultant, and policy advisor for art and technology, serving public institutions, foundations, and research laboratories in Canada.   Pioneering  work in the field of new media art, included The Art and Virtual Environments project (1991-94), one of the first large-scale and sustained investigations of virtual reality technologies as a new medium for artists,  also one of the organizers of International Symposium on Electronic Art in Montreal, 1995. Century wrote Pathways to Innovation in Digital Culture for the  Rockefeller Foundation, which was published by Leonardo Journal as an Electronic Monograph.  He was panelist and co-author for the U.S. National Academy of Science 2003 report on information  technologies and creative practices, Beyond Productivity. Century is also a pianist and composer with a broad interest in solo and chamber classical repertoire, and he composed a series of works for piano and computer-processed voice that have been performed at music festivals in Canada and the U.S., and broadcast nationally on the CBC. Video documentation of musical projects Research Interests In his scholarly work, Michael Century studies the history and sociology of art-technology interactions in the 20th century, highlighting the dynamics of innovation in creative software cultures. In progress is a monograph on the “emergence of the creative user” of computer animation software, based on the interactions between artists, engineers and scientists from the 1960s to 1980s. Growing out of this interest is a research program with a more institutional and policy focus, concerned with the development of the“Studio Laboratory” as a distinctive site for techno-cultural innovation. A second research field is the new intellectual property conventions for the new kinds of distributed authorship arising in networked digital culture. As well, Century is a pianist and composer , with a broad interest in solo and chamber classical repertoire and authors software for computer-improvisation systems. Teaching Links, 09-10 Electronic Arts Overview, Fall 2010 Multimedia Century, Arts 2540, Fall 2010 Electronic Arts Overview, Fall 2009 The Multimedia Century, Fall 2009 New Media Theory, Spring 2010 History Western Music, Spring 2010 Short biography, click here for more detail. Long associated with The Banff Centre for the Arts, Century founded the Centre's Media Arts Division in 1988. In this position, he was the instigator of The Art and Virtual Environments project (1991-94). This project was the first large-scale and sustained investigation of virtual reality technologies as a new medium for artists; the completed installations have been been displayed in exhibitions and festivals worldwide, and the entire project documented in a book-length collection Immersed in Technology: Art and Virtual Environments (MIT Press, 1996).From 1993-1996, Century was a program manager at the Canadian Centre for Information Technology Innovation (CITI), a federal research laboratory located in Montreal, with responsibility for new media arts funding. From 1996—98, he served as policy advisor to the federal department of Canadian Heritage. Since September 1997, he has been the principal of Next Century Consultants, focusing on new media and cultural policy for various public and university sector clients. For the Rockefeller Foundation, he researched and wrote a report in 1999 entitled Pathways to Innovation in Digital Culture. He was panelist and co-author for the U.S. National Academy of Science 2003 report on information technologies and creative practices, Beyond Productivity. He was educated in humanities, piano performance, and musicology at the University of Toronto, and the University of California, Berkeley, and the University of Iowa.

  • M.A. Music, history and theory, Berkeley