The Rensselaer Center for Open Source (RCOS) and the Open Source Initiative (OSI) would like to announce the approval of RCOS as an associate member of the OSI.  As the first student run organization to be accepted into the OSI, RCOS hopes to provide a roadmap for extending their unique approach to other undergraduate curricula in the furtherace of open source software models. In return, RCOS is excited to become associated with one of the most active proponents of open source software and looks forward to fruitful interactions with OSI and other OSI associates.

 

What is RCOS?

RCOS is a community of motivated RPI students who work on open source software under the guidance of experienced instructors and student mentors.  The goal of RCOS is to provide a creative, intellectual and entrepreneurial outlet for students to develop and contribute to open source applications.  Students also learn the value of open source software and how to be a successful member of the open source community.  Over the course of 10 years, RCOS students have contributed to hundreds of open source projects and developed open source projects that have in total accumulated hundreds of thousands of users.

 

Students in RCOS can participate for experience, for course credit or can receive a small stipend for their project work.  The RCOS student community is made up of Mentors and Mentees.  Mentors, who must have previously been an RCOS student member, guide students that are new to RCOS, assist with technical problems and help projects organize and make meaningful contributions.  An emphasis on student teaching encourages members to share their diverse knowledge and enables the community to solve difficult problems.  The combination of peer-driven mentorship, an active technical community, and instructors with open source experience make the RCOS community an invaluable resource for students trying to further their education and professional skillset.

 

RCOS is supported through donations from organization like Red Hat and Microsoft, who beleive in the value of introducing undergraduate students to open source concepts, communities and practices.

 

See https://rocos.io for more details

Troy, N.Y. – Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute today announced the appointment of Curt Breneman as Dean of the School of Science. The appointment is effective January 1, 2015. ...read more
Entrepreneurs routinely encounter difficult questions along the path of entrepreneurship. More than 60 Capital Region-based entrepreneurs, business executives, and academic experts will participate in the Business Opportunities to Success Summit (BOSS) on Nov.12.  ...read more
As signs of autumn like falling leaves and some cool weather days can be found across the Rensselaer campus, the campus will be buzzing with activity as thousands of Rensselaer families are expected to visit Oct. 24-26 to celebrate Family Weekend. ...read more
According to recent data compiled by the American Institute for Economic Research that ranked the 20 best small cities for college students, the Albany-Schenectady-Troy region came in at number 11 on the list. ...read more
Research from Rensselaer professors Bolek Szymanski and Gyorgy Korniss was highlighted as a success story by the Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA) within the U.S. Department of Defense. ...read more

Pages

Announcements

The article entitled: "Airplane Flight Safety Using Error-Tolerant Data Stream Processing", features Varela's data driven avionics research for flight safety. Article: http://www.brightcopy.net/allen/aesm/32-4/index.php#/6
Elsa has a PhD in Computer Science from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute.  This article describes Elsa's work on HPC at Livermore Computing. https://computation.llnl.gov/about/our-people/highlights/elsa-gonsiorowski  
With great sadness, I am writing to tell you that Terry Hayden, Senior Student Services Coordinator the Computer Science Department’s graduate program, passed away Monday afternoon at St. Peter’s Hospital in Albany. Terry joined the department in 1995, working first with both undergraduates and graduate students, but then focusing entirely on graduates as the department grew. Every new group of students quickly learned that Terry was a friendly, welcoming presence they could turn to for help with any problem either personal or academic.
Department of Computer Science invites applications for multiple Lecturer, Senior Lecturer, or Professor of Practice positions with expertise in one or more of the broad areas of computer science: Theory and Algorithms; Systems and Software; Artificial Intelligence and Data; and Vision, Graphics, Robotics, and Games, along with the ability to teach other introductory computer science courses.  The initial appointment is for three academic years, with the expectation of subsequent renewal.
James Hendler, director of the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI) Institute for Data Exploration and Applications (IDEA), has been appointed to the Homeland Security Science and Technology Advisory Committee. The committee provides scientific and technical advice to the Under Secretary for Science and Technology and senior department leadership on matters related to the expansion of technological capabilities across the homeland security enterprise.

In the News

  • The scientific swerve: Changing your research focus

    October 10, 2017 -

    Many scientists alter their research focus, at least slightly, over their career, according to studies by Boleslaw Szymanski, a computer science professor at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in Troy, New York. Szymanski’s group followed the work of more than 14,000 scientists from 1976 to 2009, using data from American Physical Society journals. The results showed that most researchers tend to stay in their field, but that those who don’t progress along a related path. In describing their findings, Szymanski and colleagues use an analogy inspired by Isaac Newton’s reflection on his own research: They describe a scientific career as a walk along the beach, moving from one interesting shell (in this case a research topic) to another. 

    These findings support a similar analysis that Szymanski’s group performed on data from journals and from U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF) grants in computer science. In this field, scientists tend to shift research focus roughly every 10 years. Some make once-in-a-career moves to substantially different areas. The field itself changes with technological advances, Szymanski says, so even researchers who stay in one area at least change methods over time. 

  • Hackers converge on RPI campus

    July 6, 2017 -

    Hundreds of students spent their weekend hacking away, competing in the third annual HackRPI marathon. The 24-hour, two-day event drew about 300 students from a wide range of schools to the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute campus. The campus’ Darrin Communications Center served as the central hub — and temporary home — for avid student hackers focused on creating projects in areas of technology that address hardware, web, data, mobile, video game and virtual reality, and the humanitarian fields, among others.

  • Alexa, What's The Future Of AI?

    July 6, 2017 -

    Once upon a time, we dreamed of artificial intelligence in outer space, in a sci-fi future, far from home. Now, we’re talking with computers in our kitchens.  Asking them anything. “Alexa, what’s the Inaugural Oath?” “How big is a blue whale?” “What’s the square root of seven trillion forty two?” Does this ambient, ask-it-anything-anytime AI give us superpowers? Make us great? Make us lazy? And what comes next? This hour On Point,  talking with Alexa, and humans, about the AI future. — Tom Ashbrook

  • The Internet of Things Needs a Code of Ethics

    July 6, 2017 -

    In October, when malware called Mirai took over poorly secured webcams and DVRs, and used them to disrupt internet access across the United States, I wondered who was responsible. Not who actually coded the malware, or who unleashed it on an essential piece of the internet’s infrastructure—instead, I wanted to know if anybody could be held legally responsible. Could the unsecure devices’ manufacturers be liable for the damage their products?

    Right now, in this early stage of connected devices’ slow invasion into our daily lives, there’s no clear answer to that question. That’s because there’s no real legal framework that would hold manufacturers responsible for critical failures that harm others. As is often the case, the technology has developed far faster than policies and regulations.

    But it’s not just the legal system that’s out of touch with the new, connected reality. The Internet of Things, as it’s called, is also lacking a critical ethical framework, argues Francine Berman, a computer-science professor at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute and a longtime expert on computer infrastructure. Together with Vint Cerf, an engineer considered one of the fathers of the internet, Berman wrote an article in the journal Communications of the Association for Computing Machinery about the need for an ethical system.

  • One room seeks all the answers at RPI

    June 1, 2017 -

    Imagine being in a room to ask questions of one of the world's most powerful computers. An artificial intelligence containing more information than the largest library, it can recognize you, hear you, see what you are pointing at, and even notice if you might be perplexed or inattentive. It knows all of your earlier work and might even anticipate your questions.

  • Opinion: Saving Our Heritage

    March 28, 2017 -

    The Trump administration's new budget blueprint proposes the effective elimination of the National Endowment for the Humanities, write Francine Berman and Cathy N. Davidson. Is that the value we place on our cultural inheritance and its future?

  • The Future Called, it Wants its Cloud Back

    January 5, 2017 -

    “Cloud telephony is a new name for something called Voice Over IP, except in a business context,” said James Hendler, director of the Institute for Data Exploration and Applications (IDEA) and the Tetherless World Professor of Computer, Web and Cognitive Sciences at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in Troy, New York. “It’s been used by consumers for 10 or 15 years,” he said, mostly by people who wanted to make long-distance calls on their computers to avoid phone bill charges.

  • RPI's Hendler On What We Are Learning From Election Data

    November 15, 2016 -

    The numbers from the election are still coming in, but one analysis indicates that despite what many of the pundits believe, the Trump victory was not driven as much by the white working class, but more by the fact that Democrats stayed home. Jim Hendler is the Director of the Institute of Data Exploration and Applications at RPI. He says while the numbers are still preliminary, it is clear that the Clinton campaign failed to get enough Democrats to the polls.

  • Research pair outlines new field of 'web science'

    November 11, 2016 -

    A pair of web scientists has written a Technology Perspective piece for the journal Science outlining the newly developing field of "web science." In their article, James Hendler with Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute and Wendy Hall, with the University of Southampton, also offer some arguments for the importance of social sciences regarding the internet as technology continues to change our world and the way people interact.  

  • Terms and Consequences: How a click could cost you money

    November 11, 2016 -

    “For some folks, the convenience of targeted advertising is always going to trump the privacy for them,” said Kristine Gloria, PhD candidate of cognitive science at RPI. ... Who has been studying public policies and computer algorithm designs.

  • Lake George Sensor Network to Be Completed With $917K National Science Foundation Grant

    November 2, 2016 -

    A high-tech sensor network for Lake George is on track for completion with a $917,000 National Science Foundation grant.

  • The World's Smartest Lake is Getting Smarter

    October 27, 2016 -

    A grant worth roughly $1 million has been awarded to the Jefferson Project to add more sensors to a network that is already giving scientists a remarkably detailed understanding of Lake George, an understanding that will help advocates and policy makers preserve its clarity and purity.

    The grant was awarded by the National Science Foundation, a federal agency and one of thesingle largest sources of funds for scientific research,  to  a  team  of researchers led by Rick Relyea, an RPI professor who serves as the director of the Jefferson Project, a collaborative effort of RPI, IBM and The Fund for Lake George.

  • The Smartest Lake on Earth

    October 6, 2016 -

    Can technology keep Lake George pristine? Bill McKibben explores the Jefferson Project.

  • Will robots help or harm? It's time for 'big thinking,' AI experts warn

    September 22, 2016 -

    “The bigger issue is that humans and AI will outperform humans working alone—that’s the one we need to pay attention to,” said Jim Hendler, professor of computer, web and cognitive sciences at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. “The existential threat is not AI, it’s not using the AI we have correctly.”

  • Ask The Experts: A Bit about Bitcoin

    August 9, 2016 -

    In an era dominated by digital technology it should come as no surprise that someone has developed a digital currency. Paypal is a digital payment system but Bitcoin, developed in 2009, is an actual digital currency that, in the last several months, has generated excitement and interest – and yes, a little concern --  in the financial services industry.

  • How A 'Nightmare' Law Could Make Sharing Passwords Illegal

    July 15, 2016 -

    People share passwords all the time. A husband might give his wife his bank account login so she can pay a bill. A professor might ask a secretary to check emails. Comedian Samantha Bee's segment on Syrian refugees featured her teaching them essential phrases in U.S. culture, including "Can I have your HBO Go login?"

    But a recent federal court ruling has advocates, researchers and the dissenting judge worried that sharing passwords, even in seemingly innocuous circumstances, could be considered illegal. That's because the anti-hacking law used is so vague that Columbia law professor Tim Wu called it "a nightmare for a country that calls itself free."

  • The brainiest of lakes

    May 6, 2016 -

    In 1791, Thomas Jefferson describes Lake George as "the most beautiful water I ever saw." Today, scientists are using gee-whiz technology to make it the smartest lake on the planet.

  • Fear Not, AI May Be Our New Best Partners in Creative Solutions – A Conversation with Dr. James Hendler

    April 7, 2016 -

    Statements about AI and risk, like those given by Elon Musk and Bill Gates, aren’t new, but they still resound with serious potential threats to the entirety of the human race. Some AI researchers have since come forward to challenge the substantive reality of these claims. In this episode, I interview a self-proclaimed “old timer” in the field of AI who tells us we might be too preemptive about our concerns of AI that will threaten our existence; instead, he suggests that our attention might be better  honed in thinking about how humans and AI can work together in the present and near future.

  • State funding pushes Lake George research project to finish

    February 10, 2016 -

    The state is kicking in a half-million dollars to complete the Jefferson Project, a multimillion dollar environmental research effort aimed at making Lake George the most measured and best understood body of water on the planet.

    On Monday, Gov. Andrew Cuomoannounced that the project, launched in 2013 by Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, IBM and the conservation group Fund for Lake George, will get funding through the Higher Education Capital Matching Grant Program.

    "We are very grateful for state funding," said Rick Relyea, project director at RPI. "This pushes the project to the finish line."

  • Jefferson Project Makes Waves With a 'Smart' Lake

    October 21, 2015 -

    Over a few short years, the Internet of things has morphed from a fascinating concept into reality. It is rapidly redefining a wide array of industries and delivering greater insights into science and research. 

    At New York's Lake George, a 32-mile-long lake located in the Adirondack Mountains, more than 60 researchers are now turning to sensors and connected systems to better understand environmental threats—including road salt, agricultural contaminants, invasive species and the growth of algae—so that they can better protect the lake and its water.

  • IBM Pushes Deep Learning with a Watson Upgrade

    July 31, 2015 -

    “A key challenge for modern AI is putting back together a field that has almost splintered among these methodologies,” says James Hendler, director of the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute for Data Exploration and Applications in Troy, New York. RPI has access to an early version of Watson donated to the university by IBM, and Hendler teaches courses based on the technology.

  • Lake George Jefferson Project provides model for waters elsewhere

    July 14, 2015 -

    Cyber-infrastructure, above and beneath the waves, is giving researchers a high-tech look at factors impacting Lake George water quality. The Jefferson Project is a long-term collaboration between IBM, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute and The Fund for Lake George that has cost more than $10 million just to ramp up.

  • IBM Makes Lake George World's Smartest Lake

    July 14, 2015 -

    When you think of the Internet of Things, you probably don't think of lakes. But IBM, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, and the Fund for Lake George are using IoT technology to make New York's Lake George a "smart lake." 

  • On New York’s Lake George, researchers fire up a state-of-the-art observatory

    July 13, 2015 -

    Academic researchers and computer giant IBM are aiming to make Lake George, a 52-kilometer-long body of water in New York state, one of the smartest lakes in the world. Late last month, scientists formally began to capture data from the first of 40 sensing platforms that will give researchers a detailed glimpse into lake behaviors such as water circulation and temperature. The information will be fed into computer models that the researchers say could help managers protect Lake George from threats such as invasive species, excessive nutrients, road salt, and pollution.

    The effort, known as the Jefferson Project, involves more than 60 scientists from theRensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI) in Troy, New York; the FUND for Lake George, a regional conservation group; and IBM research labs in Brazil, Ireland, Texas, and New York. The researchers are using Lake George as a test bed for an array of sophisticated “smart” sensors that will monitor 25 different variables, including biological characteristics and water chemistry and quality. The sensors will not only report data back to laboratories, often in real time, but be able to respond to changes in the lake environment. “Our sensors can look at other sensors around [them] and say, ‘I’m seeing something a little unusual, are you seeing it too?’” says RPI’s Rick Relyea, director of the Jefferson Project. “If so, the sensor can make the decision to sample more frequently or sample in a particular depth of water more. They have a great deal of intelligence.”

    The data the sensors collect will be fed to an IBM supercomputer that will help researchers develop five different computer models that will enable one of the Jefferson Project’s main goals: visualizing Lake George’s behavior. For example, using high-resolution weather forecasting technology developed by IBM, researchers will be able to see how runoff from big storms moves through the 600-square-kilometer Lake George watershed. Other models will allow researchers to examine the impact of the use of road salt on water quality, see how water circulates throughout the lake, and visualize lake food webs.

    The Jefferson Project isn’t the only effort to harness new technologies to wire up and study lakes. The U.S. National Science Foundation’s National Ecological Observatory Network is using similar approaches to study the impact of climate change, land-use change, and invasive species on aquatic ecosystems. Internationally, the Global Lake Ecological Observatory Network (GLEON), a grassroots network of ecologists, IT experts, and engineers, also uses new technologies to study how lakes respond to environmental change.

    This Jefferson Project isn’t the first time IBM has experimented with instrumenting a body of water, says Harry Kolar, an IBM researcher and an adjunct professor of physics at Arizona State University, Tempe. The company has helped develop many of the technologies being used at Lake George by participating in other projects, including the River and Estuary Observatory Network, an observatory system tracking the Hudson River at Denning’s Point in Beacon, New York. In 2009, IBM also launched a joint project with Ireland’s Marine Institute to monitor water quality and marine life in Ireland’s Galway Bay.

    What makes the Jefferson Project different, Kolar says, is not only the smart sensors and the high frequency with which they will collect data, but how the data will be used to help inform the models. And Paul Hanson, a limnologist at the University of Wisconsin (UW), Madison, says that although the Jefferson Project is similar to other lake-monitoring projects, “they’re doing it on steroids. More variables, more frequency, and with better integration [with] models.”

    Overall, researchers plan to equip the lake with 40 sensor-carrying platforms, some on land and some in the water; they have deployed 14 thus far. The platforms come in four “flavors”: vertical profilers that send instruments into the lake’s depths to monitor things such as water temperature, chlorophyll, and dissolved organic matter; weather stations that measure humidity, barometric pressure, and wind velocity; tributary stations that study water entering the lake; and acoustic Doppler profilers, underwater sensors that measure lake currents.

    Kevin Rose, a postdoctoral associate at UW Madison, who is active in GLEON, says IBM’s involvement makes the Jefferson Project stand out. “Private-public partnerships are going to be a hallmark of how more research is done in the future and this is a great model to see that in action,” he says.

    The ultimate test of the Jefferson Project’s value, Hanson says, will be whether local and regional officials are able to use the information to better manage and protect the body of water known as “the Queen of American Lakes.”And project director Relyea says they are aiming high. “Ultimately,” he adds, “our goal is to make this project a blueprint for understanding lakes” that can be replicated elsewhere.

    The project, which is expected to run for at least 3 years, is jointly funded by the three groups; leaders say it has a total budget “in the millions,” including direct spending and in-kind contributions. Researchers expect the Jefferson Project to have all of its systems fully integrated by the end of 2016.

  • Local developers, businesses contribute to Internet of Things revolution

    June 19, 2015 -

    Cars that drive themselves, phones that find empty parking meters, and wind turbines that talk to one another.

    These are all possibilities in the near future under what is known as the Internet of Things.

    So what is the Internet of Things?

    It doesn't have so much to do with the Internet that we know, which we typically use to search for news, connect with friends and shop online.

  • Neuromorphic Processors Leading a New Double Life

    April 16, 2015 -

    A team of researchers at the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute led by Christopher Carothers, Director of the institute’s Center for Computational Innovations described for The Platform how True North is finding a new life as a lightweight snap-in on each node that can take in sensor data from the many components that are prone to failure inside, say for example, an 50,000 dense-node supercomputer (like this one coming online in 2018 at Argonne National Lab) and alert administrators (and the scheduler) of potential failures This can minimize downtime and more important, allow for the scheduler to route around where the possible failures lie, thus shutting down only part of a system versus an entire rack.

  • Zealots Help Sway Popular Opinions

    April 6, 2015 -

    Boleslaw Szymanski, a computer scientist at the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in Troy, New York, said that the team's findings could provide some general guidance for how companies could better manage their brands.

  • Troy Record: Five Questions for Christopher Nelson

    March 18, 2015 -

    Christopher Nelson of Clifton Park: Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute graduate is one of the first 18 people in the country to receive a Professional Engineer (PE) in Software certification.

  • Children Learn Cursive by Teaching Robots

    March 18, 2015 -

    "One of the breakthrough technologies we're seeing in robotics is an increasing ability for robots to be trained, rather than programmed, by humans thanks to new sensor- and machine-learning technology," Hendler pointed out.

  • Developing infrastructure for data sharing around the world

    March 11, 2015 -

    "Impact is a primary focus for RDA," said Fran Berman, chair of RDA/U.S. "In only two years, RDA has begun fulfilling its mission to build the social and technical bridges that enable the open sharing of data."

  • New AAAS Fellows Recognized for Their Contributions to Advancing Science

    December 11, 2014 -

    Francine Berman, a professor in the computer science department at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, was elected a AAAS Fellow "for distinguished contributions to the field of computer science and community leadership in data cyber-infrastructure, digital data preservation, and high performance computing." A former chair of the AAAS section representing Information, Computing, and Communication, Berman was delighted to learn that she has been elected a AAAS Fellow.

  • What is 4chan and where did it come from?

    November 13, 2014 -

    "Generally the rules are as light as they can keep them," said Jim Hendler, a computer science professor at the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in Troy, New York ... The site's "random" board gets the most notoriety, but it's just a "small part of a much larger entity," Hendler said. "Despite the infamy, it really does some positive things. It creates community," he said, adding that 4chan remains very much user-focused in the most basic sense of the term. The site "wanted to stay most true to the notion that you could be anonymous, you could talk about whatever you wanted, that you could control the conversation."

  • Private effort aims to wire Lake George into world’s ‘smartest lake’

    November 7, 2014 -

    The project aims to instrument New York’s Lake George with five vertical profilers, 12 tributary stream monitors, eight acoustic Doppler current profilers and 11 weather stations by 2015. Organizers say the effort will make it the world’s “smartest lake.”

    “IBM, as part of their Smarter Planet effort to use cutting-edge tech, is using Lake George as a proving ground for their sensors,” said Rick Relyea, scientific lead of the Jefferson Project at RPI. “So we do have sensors from YSI (deployed), but on top of that, IBM uses its own computer boards to make them smarter.”

  • ScienceLives Interview with Francine Berman

    November 7, 2014 -

    Francine Berman is a professor of computer ccience at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. She serves on a broad spectrum of national and international leadership groups and committees, including the newly-established Research Data Alliance, which involves more than 120 U.S. and international participants, and enables researchers around the world to share and collaboratively use scientific data to speed up innovation. She also serves as a member of the National Science Foundation's Computer and Information Science and Engineering Advisory Committee.

  • Winter Road Salt – the Next Acid Rain? – May Threaten Adirondack “Queen of American Lakes”

    November 4, 2014 -

    Lake George is waiting, her future in question.  For the first time in the history of the 32-mile-long lake – a gift from long-ago glaciers that once covered the land, then melted – our actions may have imperiled her health.

  • Benedict Cumberbatch, Alan Turing and Enigma

    October 27, 2014 -

    Jim Hendler, professor of Computer Science at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in New York, has taught a course on Turing. He called Turing's work in the 1940s "stunning." "He revolutionized cryptography, the modern field of computer science, [and] the subfield of artificial intelligence," Hendler said. "A lot of the math with those things goes right back to Turing."

  • Despite Growing Data, Infrastructure Stands Still

    September 16, 2014 -

    By FRANCINE BERMAN | Data increasingly drives innovation in virtually every area of inquiry. Whether the data helps to reveal the existence of the “God particle,” the discovery of a new planet, the behavior of crowds, or the spread of disease, it is key to discovery and innovation. Data is also a national priority around the world. In the United States, White House initiatives are focusing on public access to research data, big data, and government open data.

  • Nothing to hide, everything to fear

    September 5, 2014 -

    The notion of demonstrating compliance, rather than merely achieving it, has become increasingly important to companies, says Jim Hendler, a professor in the computer science department of Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. Hendler, an adviser to TrustLayers, works with IBM on commercial applications for Watson. “We want to show that we’re using data lawfully,” he says, “not just show that we’ve locked it down the way regulators want us to lock it down.”

  • Will Innovative Advancements in Robotics Come at the Expense of Job Creation?

    September 5, 2014 -

    Jim Hendler, an architect of the evolution of the World Wide Web and professor of computer science at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, wrote: “The notion of work as a necessity for life cannot be sustained if the great bulk of manufacturing and such moves to machines—but humans will adapt by finding new models of payment as they did in the industrial revolution (after much upheaval).” 

  • Watson may study new field: humans

    July 24, 2014 -

    Watson is entering his sophomore year at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute and as the supercomputer’s role continues to evolve,Watson may never graduate. Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in Troy, New York was the first university to receive a Watson system, made famous by beating “Jeopardy” champions in 2011. IBM Corp. sent a modified Watson system to Rensselaer in January 2013.

  • How Artificial Intelligence Could Change Your Business

    July 3, 2014 -

    The scale of information growth – driven by the pace of information change – has reached the point where humans simply cannot handle it without the aid of intelligent computers, said Dr. Jim Hendler, director of the Rensselaer Institute for Data Exploration and Application (IDEA), who leads the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute project to explore new uses and directions for AI technology.

  • Making Autopilot Systems Safer

    April 11, 2014 -

    "We actually put all the data from the flight recorder in Air France 447 into our models and our computer software and we were able to recover the [correct] airspeed in 5 seconds," said Varela. "We know in aviation you have to learn from accidents to prevent future tragedies. If the software were to be included in future flight systems, we would avoid this kind of accident, I think," said Varela.

  • RPI fraternity to make neighborhood grants

    April 2, 2014 -

    A $50,000 micro-grant program sponsored by Phi Sigma Kappa fraternity that is intended to improve the quality of life in the Mount Ida neighborhood will be launched on Wednesday. The fraternity, whose members attend Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute will hand out grants of up to $1,000 to homeowners, landlords, nonprofit groups and business owners in the community. The fraternity will award 50 grants over a five-year period.  

  • High Schoolers break out the robots for battle

    March 19, 2014 -

    It's all about robotics today at RPI. Thirty eight High School teams are showing off their creations in the Tech Valley Regional Competition. It's the first time this regional event has been held in the Albany area. Photojournalist Rich Frederick takes a look.

  • Troy Record: High school students gather at RPI for annual robotics competition

    March 19, 2014 -

    More than 1,000 high school students, along with hundreds of teachers, college and professional mentors, parents, and 3,000 pounds of metal, gears, and electronics will converge at the East Campus Athletic Village at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institue in Troy, N.Y., for two days of compeition today and Saturday.  

  • Western Pa. students prepare for robotics competitions

    March 19, 2014 -

    Area high school students will take robots this weekend to Troy, N.Y., and Youngwood.

    While McKeesport Area students pack for Troy and the first of two FIRST (For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology) regional tests, others are headed for competition at Westmoreland County Community College. 

     

  • 25 Years Old, the World Wide Web’s Potential Still Untapped

    March 17, 2014 -

    James Hendler is the director of the Rensselaer Institute for Data Exploration and Applications in Troy, New York ... Hendler pointed out that even 25 years after its invention, only a fraction of the web’s potential has been realized. “Here is this force that has really changed society in so many different ways. We understand sort of the mathematics of the computer network underneath and the engineering of that but we really don’t understand the social impact.  There’s more and more research that’s starting to study what are those different effects?

  • The Gurus Speak

    March 12, 2014 -

    Here we highlight the predictions of some of the people most deeply involved in shaping our digital present ... Jim Hendler, a professor of Computer Science at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, wrote, “Three forces will continue to interact, weaving a braid that will be evolutionary, rather than revolutionary.

  • Will IPOs Continue to Soar in 2014?

    March 4, 2014 -

    Didn’t it seem like there were a ton of IPOs in 2013? That’s because there was. More than 200 companies went public last year, including big names like Twitter, Potbelly, and Hilton, making 2013 the hottest year for IPOs since 2000.

    But the real question you have to ask yourself is, why? Why did we see a rash of public offerings in the face of a lagging economic recovery and a flood of uncertainty gushing out of Washington?......

  • Google Likely Acquired Artificial Intelligence Startup To Improve Image Search

    February 12, 2014 -

    “Rumour is that Google is getting very good at identifying individuals in photos, but they are holding off from rolling out that technology,” said Jim Hendler, an artificial intelligence researcher at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, whom we spoke with recently. “From what I understand, Google is going after contextual image recognition, such as identifying whether a photo is of a social setting, if it was taken outdoors, indoors, etc.,” Hendler told us.