Biologist Douglas Swank is working to unravel some of the biggest mysteries of the human heart with help from an unexpected source – the tiny Drosophila, commonly known as the fruit fly. ...read more
In 2007, Kinsley French arrived at Rensselaer as a freshman with an interest in science and research. In intervening years, she has racked up a slew of accomplishments. ...read more
A team of researchers has developed a new type of biochip that emulates the metabolism of a human liver. ...read more
The NSF has awarded a 1.7 million grant to George Makhatadze for research to help understand the speed at which proteins fold and unfold. ...read more
A team including Rensselaer researchers have discovered that a specific gene may play a major role in the development of a life-threatening birth defect. ...read more

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Announcements

Diana Bogorodskaya, a graduate student in Biological Sciences pursuing her PhD research in the Ligon lab, has been accepted to the NSF BIO 2017: I-Corps Bio-Entrepreneurship Workshop at California State University in San Diego.  This highly competitive workshop gives participants the opportunity to work with industry professionals to learn about biotechnology commercialization and explore entrepreneurial opportunities that build on basic research.
Dr. Jennifer Hurley recently gave a plenary talk at a mini symposium entitled “Interdisciplinary Views of Chronobiology” in Santiago at the Pontifical Catholic University of Chile November 28, 2016. Five experts in the field of chronobiology including Dr. Hurley were invited to present their varied perspectives on Chronobiological research and how the field is advancing. The inaugural symposium is the first in a series and was organized to expose and encourage graduate students in Chile to think about research from an international and interdisciplinary standpoint. Dr.
“A recent ASBMB Today article discussed the results of a collaboration between the labs of George Makhatadze of Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute and Nadia Roan of the University of California, San Francisco. The paper, published in the Journal of Biological Chemistry, discussed the ability of a small molecule gallic acid to reduce HIV infectivity associated with protein aggregates found in semen.
Dr. Jennifer Hurley, Assistant Professor in the Department of Biological Sciences, has just received an award through an U01 cooperative agreement funded by the Department of Defense and the NIH National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering titled, “Multiscale Modeling of Circadian Rhythms”.  The total award is $3,932,000 with Dr. Hurley’s funding at $580,000.  The lead PI is Dr. William Cannon of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory with Drs.
Matt Schuler, post-doctoral research associate in the Rick Relyea Lab, recently published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences a study about how lizards might respond to a changing climate in different types of landscapes.

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