TROY, N.Y. — On a typical April day, Jackie Pelham would spend most of her time in a lab coat and goggles. Working at a laboratory bench, she would examine proteins found in the body. But lately, Pelham has traded her lab coat for a laptop and her lab bench for a desk in her home. Rather than observing biochemical processes, she is poring over previously collected data. Somewhat unexpectedly, even to her, Pelham sees this temporary trade-off as an opportunity. ...read more
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute researcher Malik Magdon-Ismail tailored the robust machine learning models he is developing for the COVID pandemic to work with sparse data points, like those available during the early phase in a pandemic or in smaller cities, which ordinarily make trend-spotting difficult. ...read more
An instrument currently aboard the International Space Station could grow E.coli bacteria in space, opening a new path to bio-manufacturing drugs during long term space flights, according to research published today in Nature Microgravity ...read more
A newly identified compound is a promising candidate for inhibiting the production of amyloids, the abnormal proteins that form toxic clumps, called fibrils, inside the brains of patients with Alzheimer’s disease. As published in the Royal Society of Chemistry’s Chemical Communications, the compound — known as “C1” — uses a novel mechanism to efficiently prevent the enzyme gamma-secretase from producing amyloids. ...read more
A new degree program in biological neuroscience at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute explores the structure and function of the brain and nervous system. The major, which was recently approved by the New York State Education Department, will be offered beginning in the spring 2020 semester through the Rensselaer Department of Biological Sciences. ...read more

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Announcements

Diana Bogorodskaya, a graduate student in Biological Sciences pursuing her PhD research in the Ligon lab, has been accepted to the NSF BIO 2017: I-Corps Bio-Entrepreneurship Workshop at California State University in San Diego.  This highly competitive workshop gives participants the opportunity to work with industry professionals to learn about biotechnology commercialization and explore entrepreneurial opportunities that build on basic research.
Dr. Jennifer Hurley recently gave a plenary talk at a mini symposium entitled “Interdisciplinary Views of Chronobiology” in Santiago at the Pontifical Catholic University of Chile November 28, 2016. Five experts in the field of chronobiology including Dr. Hurley were invited to present their varied perspectives on Chronobiological research and how the field is advancing. The inaugural symposium is the first in a series and was organized to expose and encourage graduate students in Chile to think about research from an international and interdisciplinary standpoint. Dr.
“A recent ASBMB Today article discussed the results of a collaboration between the labs of George Makhatadze of Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute and Nadia Roan of the University of California, San Francisco. The paper, published in the Journal of Biological Chemistry, discussed the ability of a small molecule gallic acid to reduce HIV infectivity associated with protein aggregates found in semen.
Dr. Jennifer Hurley, Assistant Professor in the Department of Biological Sciences, has just received an award through an U01 cooperative agreement funded by the Department of Defense and the NIH National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering titled, “Multiscale Modeling of Circadian Rhythms”.  The total award is $3,932,000 with Dr. Hurley’s funding at $580,000.  The lead PI is Dr. William Cannon of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory with Drs.
Matt Schuler, post-doctoral research associate in the Rick Relyea Lab, recently published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences a study about how lizards might respond to a changing climate in different types of landscapes.

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